Indiana warns hemp farmers of unscrupulous seed vendors

Indiana regulators are warning hemp farmers to watch out for predatory hemp seed vendors that are currently active within the state.

Along with a growing number of hemp growers are more reports of faulty seed and untrustworthy vendors, said Donald Robison, seed administrator at the Office of Indiana State Chemist.

Robison said some farmers are paying for seed that is never delivered, while others are receiving product that doesn’t match what was promised, such as seed for plants that test well above the 0.3% THC federal limit.

Seed vendors selling to customers in Indiana must abide by the Indiana Seed Law, which requires companies, both in- and out-of-state, to get a seed permit, reported the Purdue University News Service.

“Securing a permit means you agree to have your seed tested to ensure what is reported on the label is accurate,” Robison said. “This means the seed is tested for percent purity, percent noxious weeds, percent germination and, in the case of hemp, percent THC.”

Robison recommends farmers growing hemp only buy from the the office’s list of permitted suppliers – though it is not required – and to inform regulators if any issues arise.

“If they use and buy from the list and something goes wrong, we can help protect them,” Robison said. “That’s what we’re here for. If the seed label is inaccurate, but the seller has a permit, we can go through arbitration and help both sides reach a settlement.”

“Alternatively, if a farmer is stealing genetics from a supplier or doesn’t pay their bill, we can help protect the supplier.”

Read more about sourcing clean seeds with Hemp Industry Daily’s exclusive Hemp Variety Yearbook.

One comment on “Indiana warns hemp farmers of unscrupulous seed vendors
  1. David Radford on

    Farmers need feminized seeds, at the present time there are a large number of different cultivars, some 3,000 estimated varieties. Some are developed for fiber, some for hemp seed oil, some for animal feed, some for CBD oil.

    The finished product depends on soil quality, rain, sun, and length of time the plant is allowed to grow. Many cultivars left in the field too long will become “hot” and THC levels will rise above 0.3% if left in the ground or greenhouse to grow too long.

    Reply
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